It’s a great time to be Indian

What is India? India is more than just a country. It’s an amalgamation of hundreds, even thousands, of different cultures and faiths, living together harmoniously under one sky. It’s a country that’s seen its growth halted by horrific oppression (read: Amritsar massacre) due to Western colonialism. It’s the country from which came the world’s first university and the stepping stones to the first ever moon landing. It’s a country that’s justly going to surpass their former ruler, Great Britain, in global power and influence (some argue that it already has). Despite being plagued by poverty and riddled by structural corruption, India has seen substantial levels of economic growth in recent years, along with strengthened relations with many countries both developing and developed, from Afghanistan to the USA. In future, under the watchful gaze of one of the greatest leaders that India has ever seen, Narendra Modi, India is only going to go from strength to strength. It’s already surpassed its rival, China, in terms of economic growth, and will leave it in its wake in the next decade. So, what is India? India is the next global superpower.

A thriving, young workforce is the bedrock of the Indian economy. In 2020, the average age in India will be 29. Compare this to China, where the one child policy has ensured that the average age will be 37, and to Japan, where the average age will be a massive 48. The advantage that comes with having such a youthful population is that the dependency ratio (simply, the ratio of those not working to those working), will be at 0.4 by 2030. This means that the pressure on the productive Indian population will be substantially low, and also means that a very large proportion of the country will be working. The fact that so many people will be working leads to an increase in gross domestic output, and consequently, gross domestic product (GDP), which, in turn, leads to staggering levels of economic growth. These increased levels of economic growth result in a higher average income for the Indian worker, which leads to more taxable income for the Indian government. The increase in government revenue will encourage them to spend more on public services, the most important of which is education, leading to more people having the skill levels to work in the tertiary and quaternary sector rather than the primary sector, thus technologically advancing the country. We can already see this happening in Bangalore, which has been frequently lauded as the “Silicon Valley” of India, generating over $17 billion in revenue a year.

Huge levels of foreign direct investment are perhaps also one of the biggest feathers in the Indian tail. In the first half of 2015, India garnered $31 billion of foreign direct investment, with China only attracting $28 billion and the US $27 billion. Since the economic liberalisation that took place in 1991, foreign inflows of capital into the South Asian country have been skyrocketing, opening up far more job opportunities for a young, newly educated workforce to take. Of course, this will reduce unemployment levels, giving more people the disposable income to invest in Indian goods and services, thus increasing the revenue levels of the companies manufacturing and selling these goods and services, giving them more money to open up more branches and employ more people, who will then spend, in a virtuous cycle. The positive multiplier effect engineered by foreign capital inflows into the country results in a new degree of economic prosperity for the country as a whole, and most importantly, an increase in the quality of work in the country (unemployment is a non-issue, with unemployment rates at 3.6% as of 2014, according to the World Bank). An intrinsic problem with India, along with much of the developing world, is that much of the employment generated there is in the informal sector, which is frequently not taxed. This increase in foreign direct investment into the formal sector of the economy will hopefully result in the growth of this sector, thus resulting in an increase in taxable income and revenue for Modi’s government.

The geographic position of India is also a huge strategic advantage to the country in its quest to become an economic force. In fact, it is the control of India that gave the British Empire such global dominance (unfairly, I might add). It is for this reason that, in 1 AD, India constituted over 30% of global GDP. Nowadays, without any Western anchors to their progress, their geographical position will ensure them a comparative advantage over other countries with regards to trade. India’s geographical advantage is perhaps put best by George Curzon, a British statesman, who proclaimed that “On the West, India must exercise a predominant influence over the destinies of Persia and Afghanistan; on the north, it can veto any rival in Tibet; on the north-east . . . it can exert great pressure upon China, and it is one of the guardians of the autonomous existence of Siam. Possession of India gave the British Empire its global reach.” The favourable relations which India has kept with many other countries will also work in their favour, looking forward. The biggest global power in the world, the United States of America, views India very favourably, with both Narendra Modi and Barack Obama having visited the USA and India respectively in 2015. The USA, along with other countries, has India’s core interests at mind, and will definitely not be a roadblock to any future plans. India also has good relations with many other powers, including the United Kingdom, Spain, France, and even Saudi Arabia. This will serve as a massive boon to Modi’s country in future; with India’s strengthened relationships with China, their biggest direct opposition is Pakistan.

The biggest challenge for India now is to tackle the systemic corruption present within the country, and to solve the issue of poverty within the South Asian nation; large steps are already being taken by Modi’s government to resolve this. Under the stewardship of who will come to be known as one of the greatest Prime Ministers in Indian history, India is proceeding into one of its brightest eras yet.

52 Comments Add yours

  1. Jo Weber says:

    Awesome article! I like your blog. Keep up the good work!

    Like

    1. Thank you very much 🙂

      Like

  2. Scottie says:

    Reblogged this on Scotties Toy Box and commented:
    A thoughtful post by an clearly smart person proud of their country. As they should be. Everyone is proud of their own country and the things their country has done. The only thing I would wonder about is the idea that all its oppression came from out side influences. Yes they were misused by the British in the past. No doubt that hurt them in many ways. However like all countries they have their own internal problems that hurt them also. I wish this country the very best and the young author a grand and great future. I look forward to reading more of the wonderful diverse country. Hugs

    Like

    1. Thank you so much for the reblog and the praise 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Scottie says:

        You deserved it, you write well. Best wishes for you. I will read more on your blog later, I have some others I have not been to in weeks that I simply must visit. Hugs

        Like

      2. Thank you very much 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Scottie says:

    I look forward to reading more about your country and its ways. Best wishes. Hgus

    Like

    1. Thank you so much; it’s not really my country though 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Scottie says:

        Oh, sorry, you wrote with such passion I thought it was. Where are you from if you don’t mind me asking? You have a great passion in your writing. Hugs

        Like

      2. I’m British but ethnically Indian, however I don’t really identify as Indian because I’ve lived in Britain my whole life 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Scottie says:

        Cool, we all have to have both the place we are and the place we came from. Be well. Hugs

        Like

  4. Scottie says:

    Sorry should have been hugs, not hgus. 🙂 Dang typos.

    Like

  5. All in all… loved this! Very interesting with the surpassing of China by India in terms of GDP. Where we are not surprised, is the tech development and establishment of “India’s Silicon Valley”. India was exporting a plethora if IT Technicians all around the world, it was only a matter of time where the intellectual capacity would localise and develop.

    Great write up and highly informative. Thanks. The LR Team.

    Like

    1. Thank you so much, and I wholly agree with all the points made 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Ronald says:

    A very interesting read, but it would help if you backed up your claims about India’s Prime Minister with some facts and reasons why it is such a great Prime Minister.

    Like

    1. Thank you very much for the comment and the praise. I’ll be sure to take your advice on board and to comment on why he is such a great Prime Minister. For now, I’ll just say that his revolutionary programs such as “Clean India” et al mark him out as a revolutionary and someone who will steer India into its greatest era yet.

      Like

  7. R. Johann says:

    Your insight into economics is unusual for a person at your age. I am Nordic in background and proud of it. Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, rank above the US in quality of life. This, despite their socialist form of government that is slowly losing the negativity here it once had here caused by right wing politicians. If you are not familiar with Rosa Luxemburg, I suggest you check YouTube for a docu-drama of her life, or read the recently released book “Red Rosa”, I believe an enlightened socialism, coupled with decreasing class distinctions might be of advantage to India. Unfortunately we seem to be going the other direction.

    Like

    1. Thank you so much for the comment 🙂 I’m a firm believer in an amalgamation of socialist and capitalist policies to make a country develop.

      Like

  8. dinobeano says:

    Shrey, a very good piece. I have posted it on my blog http://www.dmerican.wordpress.com I am 77 years old and Professor of International Relations and Dean, Techo Sen School of Government and International Relations, The University of Cambodia, Phnom Penh.Please keep me posted on your new articles via my e-mail dmerican2@gmail.com. Kind regards, Din

    Like

    1. Thank you very much; I’ll keep you posted 🙂

      Like

  9. mista says:

    A wonderful read. Are you truly 15?

    Like

    1. Thank you so much. Yes, I am truly 15 🙂

      Like

  10. OJB says:

    Yeah, it all sounds great in theory. Is there a potential problem with the rapidly growing population? What happens when automation leads to less jobs for all these new, young potential workers? Also, the countries which have been successful in the past (Japan, China) tend to achieve that success based on a cheap labour economy which cannot last because eventually workers want a fair deal. Overall, I think you make some good points but don’t think things are quite as great as you suggest they are.

    Like

    1. Thanks for the comment. Yeah, there is the potential of a strain on resources that occurs with a rapidly growing population. When automation leads to less jobs for these workers, automation will have already led to less jobs around the world, so relatively, India will not feel the brunt of this so much and will simply shift more workers into the tertiary and quaternary sector. In response to your final point, I would say that with the low cost of living in India right now, many workers will already be happy with the money they’re being given, and so they won’t “fall” the same way China and Japan did. Thanks again for the comment!

      Like

      1. OJB says:

        I think history indicates that you are being too optimistic and have put too much confidence in the standard economic theory narrative we hear so often. I guess time will tell. I’ll post a comment here in 10 or 20 years time when I see which of us was right! 🙂

        Like

      2. 🙂 we’ll see haha!

        Like

  11. I enjoyed reading this very much. I have Indian friends who tell me terrible stories of the corruption in the country from the very top to the bottom of the system and how difficult it can be to get anything done honestly. That seems now to be the major hurdle holding India back. However I can’t help but think of the extremes in India from those who are very rich at the top, to the very poor and often rural communities at the bottom, the lack of women’s rights, and access to basic sanitation. It certainly is a country with a lot of challenges.

    Like

    1. I have to agree with you on that! Thanks for the comment 🙂

      Like

  12. Great article! I enjoyed reading it! India is on my “MUST VISIT” list.

    Like

    1. Thank you so much! I’m glad to hear it 🙂

      Like

  13. dacounsel says:

    Wow! Lots of interesting facts! Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  14. Koninika says:

    Having grown up in India, I enjoyed your blog post! You are a wonderful writer and your thought process is well laid out! Thanks for a good read!

    Like

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Like

  15. K Das says:

    The article could not have come at a more opportune time as I have just returned from a week tour visit to Delhi and Kashmir with my wife.

    I am afraid I have to burst the bubble of the unrealistic optimism of the author who goes ballistic with his praise of Modi and all about a great India.

    Nobody goes around looking for faults big or small but when they stare at India, you can’t help noticing them. Let me recount some.

    As the plane was landing at the Delhi International Airport I could see the terminal building top front emblazoned with the lettering TERMINAL 3. It was an eyesore because a big air-con compressor was mounted over the lettering smack over the alphabets M and I. I understand that the terminal was built about 5 years ago. Apparently this was a fixture added on later. Where is the forward planning? Are the top airport management honchos blind or can’t be bothered? Don’t they have thinking engineers to find a way out to place the annoying compressor elsewhere out of sight?

    The airport toilet half stinks

    Most service sectors and counters are overstaffed with no added value absolutely. I saw 5- 6 staff pushing out a row of empty trolleys – a job that will take 1-3 men in KL or 1-2 in Singapore.

    Staff seem to be auto programmed showing no initiative. We stayed in a very posh hotel (name suppressed) pre-booked and pre-paid for two. And yet when we checked into the room, the toiletries provided for was for one person. This was rectified. Later when asked for room slipper, the guy brings one pair knowing well that there are two of us. This was at the snow capped and snow falling hill resort at Pahalgam, (Kashmir) – a beautiful breath-taking scenic spot, really heavenly.

    The hotel (name suppressed) at Srinagar (Capital) was equally posh and opulent. A overseas call message for us came at 4 pm and it was not delivered to us by the reception staff until breakfast time the next day when we were at the Restaurant. When questioned about the unacceptable delay, they come up with a load of stupid answers like the room phone line was not working. If so, don’t you sent someone to fix it, ring the bell or drop a note under the door?

    We wanted to see a second hill resort at Gulmarg but three-quarter way through we changed our mind and made a u turn. Our arranged-for car driver took us to the first base station where we were harassed endless to buy or rent head caps, leather boots, goggles, overcoats etc. A tour guide insisted we hire him to take us up and with our driver (who seemed to be familiar with the guide) recommending so, we had no choice but to hire him. When we arrived at the 2nd base station, we saw the place down right filthy with snow all around the ground. The people were spitting and urinating. I saw drops of hardened, half snow covered human faeces here and there. This put me off and we drove back. I have more to tell but I will stop here. Yes this is incredible India!

    Economy is growing and booming – true. But the people who benefit are largely the rich and the powerful and the middle-class. Millions of others struggle with their day to day life.

    India is an amalgamation of hundreds, even thousands, of different cultures and faiths, living together harmoniously under one sky, writes the author. Harmoniously? He must be kidding himself. India is the most disunited country in the world. It is divided into States, language and linguistic wise, and within States, multi-casts wise. Overlaying this is the perennial Hindu- Muslim animosity and conflicts made worse by the Hindutva (basically anti-Muslim) agenda practiced by the ruling BJP headed by Modi. If anything binds them it is cricket, cinema and quarrelsome politics – hardly hard values.

    India may send man to Moon and Mars. Economy can grow 10-15%. These wont help India in strategic sense. A cohesive society will, which India is not, unlike Pakistan and China – one people, one language and one religion – more or less. Under present circumstances, if ever India next goes to war with Pakistan or China, my gut feeling is that it is India that will bite the dust.

    Modi is trying hard to build India as one of world’s leading economic powers. But he is surrounded by hardcore Hindu-agenda primed party leaders, which can hamper his supra plans for India’s future. Often he seems to act on his own without consulting his advisors. Few days back, he sent a Twitter message to Afghan President, Ashraf Ghani wishing him Happy Birthday. The President, whilst graciously accepting the greetings, politely pointed out that Modi had sent it 3 months too early. At another occasion I was watching on TV Modi addressing a Conference of Indian Business leaders. He spoke well on (his) “Make in India” theme without script. He ended his speech with “Thats all” and no thank you. I found it funny. World leaders at such conferences will not usually use such term. But teachers would in class rooms at the end of a lesson.

    Like

    1. Thanks for such a lengthy comment! In my honest opinion, I feel that all of the “social” drawbacks which you mentioned will fall away with increased economic development; it’s what’s happened in numerous countries such as China and Japan while developing; sooner or later, they work more efficiently. I’m not sure how you can say that India would lose to Pakistan in a war; as has been evidenced numerous times in the past, Pakistan is simply no match for India in terms of military prowess, and is a country with its own structural problems, far more than there are in India. It’s true that Hindu nationalism can be a problem in India, however I’d like to disagree with your rebuke of my point that “India is an amalgamation of hundreds, even thousands, of different cultures and faiths, living together harmoniously under one sky”. Despite what the media will show you regarding India not being a very tolerant country etc etc. it doesn’t change the fact that India does have thousands of different cultures and faiths living under one sky, unlike other countries such as, indeed, Pakistan, where non-Muslims are vehemently oppressed. Finally, I don’t really think that you can use the ending of a speech by Modi to indicate any structural problems within India as a whole.Thanks again for the comment 🙂

      Like

  16. A very good post, and hopefully you can participate in the emergence of India and share in the benefits. Your comment about corruption being an important problem to be dealt with is very apt, and we all hope your government is successful.

    Like

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Like

  17. K Das says:

    I had earlier posted my above comments in a Malaysian blog (dinmerican.wordpress.com) which carried your article. There were some responses from readers and one that tickled me somewhat was (I believe) from a local Chinese – a Chinese as much as an Indian you are. Race hubris can sometimes colour one’s perspective. Here it is:

    THE says: February 19, 2016
    /// It’s already surpassed its rival, China, in terms of economic growth, and will leave it in its wake in the next decade. So, what is India? India is the next global superpower. ///
    The blissful ignorance of a teenager. A swallow does not a summer make.
    China:
    GDP (ppp): USD19.5 trillion
    GDP per capita (ppp): USD14,000
    GDP growth: 6.8%(2015), 7.3%(2014), 7.7%(2013)
    India:
    GDP (ppp): USD8.0 trillion
    GDP per capita (ppp): USD6,300
    GDP growth: 7.3%(2015), 7.3%(2014), 6.9%(2013)

    Like

  18. K Das says:

    (Re-posted as one para was left out previously)

    I had earlier posted my above comments in a Malaysian blog (dinmerican.wordpress.com) which carried your article. There were some responses from readers and one that tickled me somewhat was (I believe) from a local Chinese – a Chinese as much as an Indian you are. Race hubris can sometimes colour
    one’s perspectives. Here it is:

    THE says: February 19, 2016
    /// It’s already surpassed its rival, China, in terms of economic growth, and will leave it in its wake in the next decade. So, what is India? India is the next global superpower. ///

    The blissful ignorance of a teenager. A swallow does not a summer make.

    China:
    GDP (ppp): USD19.5 trillion
    GDP per capita (ppp): USD14,000
    GDP growth: 6.8%(2015), 7.3%(2014), 7.7%(2013)
    India:
    GDP (ppp): USD8.0 trillion
    GDP per capita (ppp): USD6,300
    GDP growth: 7.3%(2015), 7.3%(2014), 6.9%(2013)

    Last year was the first time that India’s economic growth rate exceed China’s in several decades. Both in absolute term and on per capita basis, India’s economy is still less than half of China’s. Precisely because China has been growing at such a break-neck pace for the past few decades, it has to slow down. And because the Indian elephant has been lumbering in the past few decades, it can attain high growth because of its low base. How long can it grow at high rate? I just hope the wake is not created by the Indian ship running into sunken shipwrecks. And that those of us not-so-young folks here will live to attend India’s wake.

    Like

  19. Batman says:

    Nice post…keep up the good work…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Like

  20. I honestly can’t believe you are only 15. I’m 23 and cant understand all this! LOL

    Like

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Like

  21. kblackie says:

    You’re a fantastic writer!! Really enjoying your blog and reading your thoughts. Hard to believe you’re a teenager!!

    Like

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the share 🙂

      Like

  22. Anirban Kar says:

    Good Website. Thanks for stopping by in my blog- http://www.technologypolicies.org! You have got some awesome articles in your kitty. Please keep up the good work. Best wishes!

    Like

    1. Thank you so much 🙂

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s